HTML for the World Wide Web with XHTML and CSS

HTML for the World Wide Web with XHTML and CSS

Its important for anyone who creates Web siteseven those who rely on powerful editors like Dreamweaver or GoLiveto know HTML. The World Wide Web Consortium rewrote HTML as a subset of XML dubbing it XHTML 1.0 and the allowable code will eventually be stricter. Tags that are being phased out are labeled deprecatedcurrent browsers can still handle them, but if you want your site to keep up with future browsers, not to mention conform to accessibility requirements, you will want to get on top of XHTML.

Of course, Elizabeth Castro manages to write books that not only speak to those who are already fluent in HTML, but are good for newbies too. She makes it a breeze to create sites that are visually stylish and technically sophisticated without the expense of buying an editor. CSS; creating a variety of layouts; and dealing with tables, frames, forms, multimedia, a bit of JavaScript including mouseovers, WML for mobile device displays, debugging, publishing, and publicizing your site.

As with all Visual QuickStart Guides, this one features clear and concise instructions side by side with wellcaptioned illustrations and screen shots that show both the source code and the resulting effect on the Web page. The index is extremely detailed, making this a great reference.

Also great for reference are the outstanding appendices. The first is an extensive list of tags and attributes, indicating which are deprecated and/or proprietary and on which page they are discussed. A similar appendix shows CSS properties and values; given the future of Web coding, this chart alone is worth the price of the book. Other handy charts cover intrinsic events, symbols and character Unicodes, and an expanded color chart that goes way beyond the virtually archaic Websafe palette. All of which makes this a definite musthave for every Web designers bookshelf. Angelynn Grant